Oct 112015

If you think you have a good pasta and broccoli recipe, this one‘s better— the story’s a bonus…

Nonna Domenica's Macaroni and Broccoli with Anchovy. From Italian Home Cooking: 125 Recipes to Comfort Your Soul, by Julia della Croce. Photo: Christopher Hirsheimer & Melissa Hamilton

Nonna Domenica’s Macaroni and Broccoli with Anchovy. From Italian Home Cooking: 125 Recipes to Comfort Your Soul, by Julia della Croce (Kyle Cathie, 2010). Photo: Christopher Hirsheimer & Melissa Hamilton


Jun 162015
Rapini: Ultimate Italian Soul Food with 8 New Recipes for the Beloved Bitter Greens

You may know it as “broccoli rabe,” but any Italian will prickle at that mangled term for their beloved bitter greens. Here’s a crash course on how to pronounce it, cook it and love it, with eight terrific new recipes, read on….

Mar 302015
Victor Hazan Italianizes My Irish Stew

My readers will now and then offer comments on my recipes, but no one is more exacting than Victor Hazan, husband of and collaborator with the late Marcella Hazan and indeed himself a very fine cook. Here is a message he sent me about my Beef and Guinness Stew recipe, which I offered in my Zester Daily column for St. Patrick’s Day:  I followed it more or less scrupulously, save for some things an Italian cook wouldn’t go for, e.g. boiled potatoes served with their skins on. Che barbarità! I peeled and quartered them and threw them in with the meat after it had […more…]

Jan 182015
Polenta: The Long and the Short of It, with Inspiration from Marcella

Nearly twenty-five years ago I wrote an article for Cook’s magazine titled “Polenta: To Stir With Love.” In it, I advocated the traditional method for stirring the cornmeal and water continually as it simmers on the stove for lump-free and silky results, just as I had watched my mother and countless cooks in Italy’s polenta-loving regions do. Although most cornmeal package directions call for simmering it for some 45 minutes, many Italian cooks believe that it should be cooked for at least an hour or even longer, to improve its creaminess and render it more digestible. (Where the stirring was once done […more…]

Dec 192014
Still Time Left for Making the Fruitcake You Can Love!

True English fruitcake—sumptuous, evocative, intoxicating— is something you can love. Here is a recipe dedicated to you for Christmas—especially to my friends who think they hate fruitcake. It’s a revelation: continue reading here for the recipe and story.